Friday, September 8, 2017

A POST ABOUT A BIRD ON A POST

Bird on a post
I took this picture and just had to share, keeping with the theme of a little good news for a change.  

I thought it came out pretty neat.  This bird (a mockingbird I believe) must have sat on ten different fence posts.  After about the sixth one, I grabbed my camera and watched it hop from post to post, finally stopping long enough to let me capture the image as it turned to look at me.  

Or maybe it just relented and thought "FINE, take the dang picture already, I've got other things to do today"...


It's been a crazy week at work, as expected, several hundred claims from our office alone.  I'll catch up on comments this weekend, so keep 'em coming.  

And for those blog readers in Florida, PLEASE LEAVE if you haven't already.  Such a scary storm.


17 comments:

Colleen said...

What a Great photo of the Purdy Bird which I agree; it's a Northern Mockingbird.
Cool Facts
It’s not just other mockingbirds that appreciate a good song. In the nineteenth century, people kept so many mockingbirds as cage birds that the birds nearly vanished from parts of the East Coast. People took nestlings out of nests or trapped adults and sold them in cities such as Philadelphia, St. Louis, and New York, where, in 1828, extraordinary singers could fetch as much as $50.
Northern Mockingbirds continue to add new sounds to their repertoires throughout their lives. A male may learn around 200 songs throughout its life.
The Northern Mockingbird frequently gives a "wing flash" display, where it half or fully opens its wings in jerky intermediate steps, showing off the big white patches. No one knows why it does this, but it may startle insects, making them easier to catch. On the other hand, it doesn’t often seem to be successful, and different mockingbird species do this same display even though they don’t have white wing patches.
Northern Mockingbirds sing all through the day, and often into the night. Most nocturnal singers are unmated males, which sing more than mated males during the day, too. Nighttime singing is more common during the full moon.
Northern Mockingbirds typically sing from February through August, and again from September to early November. A male may have two distinct repertoires of songs: one for spring and another for fall.
The female Northern Mockingbird sings too, although usually more quietly than the male does. She rarely sings in the summer, and usually only when the male is away from the territory. She sings more in the fall, perhaps to establish a winter territory.
The oldest Northern Mockingbird on record was at least 14 years, 10 months old when it was found in Texas.
More information: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Mockingbird/lifehistory

Colleen said...

Thoughts and prayers who are in the path of Irma.
Stay safe everyone.

Tomato Thymes said...

Thanks for your post and my niece is in Tampa and we have friends in Puerto Rico which is having power outages . Irma and Harvey have really been devastating.

donna baker said...

Mockers are my favorite bird. It looks like a baby chicken hawk. A mom and dad are trying to teach their baby chicken hawk how to hunt and feed itself around the lake. It just sits in the trees and cries and calls to them.

Elephant's Child said...

My heart goes out to those affected by weather madness. World wide.

Texas Rose said...

Mockingbirds are one of my favorite birds. Their songs are so unique and varied and keep me company when I'm outside. And they seem to be such observant, intelligent birds.

My heart goes out to all those affected by this terrible storm and also all of Harvey's victims.

I hope you and 2nd Man enjoy this weekend of beautiful, cooler weather.
I'm going to get my garden into shape for a Fall garden and then do some plantings in it.

Practical Parsimony said...

My favorite sighting of a mocking bird was the time a cat was slinking across the street, thinking if could be invisible to the mocking bird if it stayed low. The mocking bird pecked that cat all the way across the street and to the shrubs.

I love to hear mockingbirds! Nice picture.

Galestorm said...

I watched some Mockingbirds chase a snake out of my yard this summer! They are good birds!

Praying for all of those in the path of Irma. I will be so glad when hurricane season is over.

1st Man said...

You always come up with the best info. Thanks for this. They are fascinating birds for sure!

1st Man said...

Yes, looks like Florida has been hit hard. Sending wishes to them.

1st Man said...

It's so bad. Thinking of everyone there.

1st Man said...

Awww, that's probably neat to watch Probably makes you want to help in some way, ha.

1st Man said...

It IS worldwide huh? Thinking of everyone impacted. So sad.

1st Man said...

It was a good weekend. And watch tomorrow's post for an update to the garden.

I think Irma is going to be really bad in the light of day Monday.

1st Man said...

Oh mockingbirds and cats don't mix well, ha. They do have a great "song".

1st Man said...

Chasing a snake? Wow! OK, they need to get busy at the farm (well, with the bad snakes, ha). Yes, we are also so ready for it to be over.

Galestorm said...

I've seen Bluejays do the same. I'm sure there are nests nearby and they chase snakes away to them from getting in their nests. You might want to put up some birdhouses!